Eastern Pipistrelle Bats of Maryland

The Eastern Pipistrelle has a body length of 3 ½ inches with a wingspan of 9 inches. Its body weight is about .17 to .28 ounces. This bat is easily distinguished by its tri-color dorsal fur. It has dark brown tips at the base with a yellowish brown coloring in the middle. This is considered the smallest bat in the Eastern states. The nickname for this bat is the Butterfly bat because of its moth like flight pattern.

Physical Discription

  • Weight –  .17 ounces to .28 ounces
  • Wingspan –  9 inches
  • Body Length –  3 ½ inches

Habits and Habitat

This bat typically spends its summers in the same general area where it hibernates for the winter. They do not travel more than fifty miles to a winter hibernation site. They roost in caves more than any other bat in the eastern United States. They will sometimes hibernate in rock crevices and quarries but prefer to hibernate in abandoned mines and caves. In the summer they will roost in hollow trees, rock crevices and sometimes buildings. This bat is one of the first to start hibernating usually in September or October and they are one of the last to emerge from hibernation in the spring. Males are usually solitary and the females will roost with populations of 35 or less. The average life of these bats are 4-8 years.

Range

The Eastern Pipistrelle is found in the eastern part of the United States ranging as far west as Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, and Texas. They also range northward from southern Canada and southward to Honduras. The Eastern Pipistrelle does not travel more than 50 miles from their summer roosting site to their winter roosting site. This bat will spend 6 to 9 months out of the year hibernating in caves and abandoned mines that are between 46 degrees and 55 degrees. They will hibernate individually in an area of a cave or mine that is quiet and does not have any activity. These bats will hibernate in the same cave or mine throughout their entire life. In the summer up to 35 females will roost in maternity colonies in tree cavities, rock crevices and even buildings and attics. The males will roost solitary in tree cavities and rock crevices.

Mating and Reproduction

The Eastern Pipstrelle mates during their fall migration to their hibernating roost. The females store the sperm through the winter hibernation and become pregnant in April or May when they emerge from hibernation and migrate back to their summer roosting place. The females are pregnant for approximately 44 days at which time they give birth to two pups. The pups are born blind, hairless and weighs about 1.6 grams. The pups are able to fly at about 3 to 4 weeks old and are weaned from their mother’s milk at about 4 weeks old. As a side note, this is one of the few bats that give birth to twins, probably because of the high mortality rate of the young.

Diet

The Eastern Pipistrelle emerges from its roost earlier than other bat species do to make its first of two feeding runs for the night. The second run for food usually happens around midnight. They search for food over waterways and the edges of tree lines feeding on moths, beetles, mosquitoes, midges, ants and a variety of other insects. This bat will eat 25% of its body mass in the first 30 minutes of hunting in one night. If bats are in your crawl space or attic give us a call or contact online to schedule an appointment for an inspection with one of our professional Bat Control Technicians. We can humanly evict the bats from your home and seal your rooftop to prevent bats from entering another area.

LITTLE BROWN BATS IN MARYLAND

LITTLE BROWN BATS IN MARYLAND

If you have a colony of bats in your attic give us a call at 443-417-3137 or 202-557-1443 or 240-599-6815 to schedule an inspection with a bat expert. Our Wildlife Control Technicians can humanly evict the bats and seal up any existing or potential entry points to prevent bats from re-entering your home.

LITTLE BROWN BAT (Myotis lucifugus)

PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION

forearm — 1.34 to 1.61 inches (3.4 to 4.1 cm)

wingspan — 9.02 to 10.59 inches (22.9 to 26.9 cm)

ears — 0.55 to 0.63 inches (1.4 to 1.6 cm)

Weight – approximately ¼ oz.

The Little Brown Bat looks identical to the Big Brown Bat except for the difference in size. The Little Brown Bat has blackish brown fur on the back and a grayish fur on the under belly. Typically Little Brown Bats live 7 to 10 years in the wild but have been noted to live up to 31 years in captivity. They are the most populated of all bat species in Maryland.  They have average eye sight despite popular belief that they are nearly blind.  They do not have night vision like some other nocturnal animals so they rely on echolocation to find food as they take flight several times through the night.

HABITAT and HABITS of the LITTLE BROWN BAT

Little Brown Bats hibernate during the cold winter months from September or October through to April or May; the temperature during that time period will determine how soon they go into hibernation and how soon they emerge from hibernation.  During mid-fall they leave their summer roosting site and fly from a few miles to a few hundred miles to their hibernation site. The hibernation site must be cool but remain above freezing.  Often they are found roosting and hibernating with the Big Brown Bat.

As Little Brown Bats emerge from their day time roost around dusk they seek out a body of water and skim the top for a drink.  They also like to roost close to water because water attracts a wide variety of flying insects such as mosquitoes, flies, beetles, and moths.  Each night the Little Brown Bat leaves their roost and makes several feeding flights.  Just like most mammal including other bat species and humans, the Little Brown Bat will eat until it is full and then a few hours later it will be hungry again, it’s kind of like having breakfast, lunch and dinner.

REPRODUCTION AND MATING HABITS OF THE LITTLE BROWN BAT

Females reach sexual maturity at 8 months old, while males do not reach sexual maturity until their second summer.  Little Brown Bats mate in the fall during the journey to their hibernating roost. However, the females do not become pregnant until the following spring when they leave the hibernation roost and fly back to their summer roosting site. During mid to late spring and early summer females gather in nursery colonies that can range from a few bats to thousands of bats.   Females give birth to one pup in June or July. The pup stays with mom for about 4 weeks at which time the pups are able to fly and feed on their own.  Males are solitary when females gather in maternity colonies and during the time period when females are raising their pups. Males will roost in hollow trees, under loose shingles and siding, or any other structure that is suitable for roosting.

WHERE DOES THE LITTLE BROWN BAT LIVE?

The Little Brown Bat lives in a variety of manmade and natural structures like hollow trees, under bridges, behind shutters, in attics, chimneys, slate roofs, loose shingles, barns, behind loose siding, and any other areas it can squeeze into that is suitable for roosting.

The Little Brown Bat has a vast range throughout most of North America.  It is found from western Alaska southward through most of California, central Arizona, across the Rocky Mountains and the mid-west and along most of the east coast. This bat is not found in most of the southern states along the Gulf of Mexico, southern Great Plains and much of the southeastern Coastal Plain.

WHAT DOES THE LITTLE BROWN BAT EAT

These impressive little bats can eat up to 1,200 insects a night including mosquitoes, midges, spiders, moths, hoppers, small beetles, and dragonflies. They will leave the roost several times per night to feed.  It is very common to find the Little Brown Bat roosting close to a body of water where insect populations are high.

For more information about our wildlife control services, contact us at 443-417-3137 or go to our contact us page. We humanely resolve wildlife dilemmas, no matter how big or small. Let us keep wildlife out of your sight and mind. Mid-Atlantic Wildlife Control is here to protect you from invasive wildlife. Our company is fully insured and licensed by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, the Pennsylvania Game Commission, Delaware Fish & Game and Virginia Fish & Game. Call us for wildlife control services. Check us out on Facebook and Twitter as well.

Eastern Small-Footed Bat of Maryland

Eastern Small-Footed Bat of Maryland

The Eastern Small-Footed Bat is found from Canada through the eastern U.S. It’s one of the smallest bats in this region—it measures just 36-95 mm in length. Its hind feet are very tiny and reach just around 7-8 mm; that’s also how the bat got its name. Eastern Small-Footed Bats feed on small insects, including flies, beetles, moths, etc. These bats are hard to come by despite their wide range. You are most likely to encounter them in caves and mines during hibernation from November to April.

Physical Description

  • Adult total length: 2 ¾” – 3 ¾”
  • Tail: 1” – 1 ¾”
  • Hind foot: ¼” – 3/8”
  • Weight: 1/7 – 1/4 oz.
  • Wingspan:  8.3” – 9.2”

The Eastern Small-Footed Bat has tiny ears measuring under 0.6″. Its fur is soft and silky, with a yellowish tan to golden brown color. Its belly is gray, while its face, ears, and wings are black. Its distinguishing characteristics are its black face mask, and its tiny 0.3″ hind feet. The Eastern Small-Footed Bat has been recorded living up to the age of 12 years.

Habits and Habitat

Not much is known about the habitat preference of the Eastern Small-Footed Bat, however evidence suggests that it prefers hilly or mountainous areas. These bats are the last to enter hibernation in late fall and are the first to emerge from hibernation in the early spring. In the winter, they hibernate in abandoned mines and caves. In the summer they will roost in buildings and rock crevices. During hibernation they are found in the coldest parts of the mine or cave where the temperatures are below freezing.

Like all bats that reside in Maryland, mating occurs in autumn, and the sperm is stored within the female through the winter hibernation. The females become pregnant when they emerge from hibernation in the spring. Each female gives birth to one pup in late May to July. Males are solitary throughout the spring and summer however the females form nursery colonies that usually consist of about 20 females.

Range

The Eastern Small-Footed Bat ranges from The Northeastern United States and Canada down to the southeast and westward to Oklahoma. They prefer coniferous forests and are active in mountainous regions. In the spring and summer they roost in rock bluffs, under tree bark, in hollow trees, and in manmade structures such as attics, bridges and in turnpike tunnels. In late fall they are one of the last bats to enter into caves and abandoned mines to hibernate.  They hibernate individually or in small clusters of 25 to 30 bats usually hanging at the entrance of the cave or mine where the humidity is lower and temperatures drop below freezing.

Diet

The Eastern Small-Footed Bat feeds on flying insects such as beetles, mosquitoes, moths, flying ants and flies. They are capable of filling their stomach within one hour after they start to feed. They search for food in open fields along tree lines, below tree canopies, over and bodies of water, along cliffs and rock ledges. These bats emerge to feed just before the sun has fully set or at dusk.

If you have seen bats flying in and out of your rooftop give us a call or contact online to schedule an inspection. Our skilled Bat Control Technicians will conduct a thorough inspection of your home to locate all entry points that bats are using to access your attic space. After the inspection is completed we will evict the bats in accordance with the laws and guidelines set by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

Squirrel Control: What are the benefits of Squirrel Removal in Maryland?

Squirrel Control: What are the benefits of Squirrel Removal in Maryland?

 Edgewood Squirrel Removal Services

Are you a Baltimorean whom comes across squirrels often in your community? You’re not alone. Large populations of squirrels inhabit communities in the Baltimore Metropolitan Area. Why are there so many squirrels inhabiting communities in Baltimore MD? Squirrels are spotted all around Baltimore because they have a good food source. Squirrels feed on foods such as seeds, nuts, fungi, berries, bird eggs and baby birds. Some communities in Baltimore that frequently come across squirrels are Timonium, Towson and Carney. The squirrels in these areas often live in acorn trees, particularly in backyards. If you have a bird feeder in your backyard, there’s a good chance squirrels will visit the bird feeder to eat the nutritional seeds. As for nesting, squirrels prefer to use home attics and crawl spaces. How much home damage can squirrels cause to my home? Squirrels can cause a great deal of damage to Baltimore Homes because squirrels commonly enter Baltimore homes from rooftops by chewing through home exteriors. Here is a list of common home material squirrels chew:

  • -Edge of the home
  • -Soffit
  • -Fascia board
  • -Gable Vent
  • -Dormer Pocket

Once an entry hole is made, squirrels can access your home at anytime and bring in rainwater that causes water damage and mold problems. Squirrels can even make Baltimore homes more vulnerable to fire hazards. According to national studies, Squirrels cause 25,000 fires annually in the United States by chewing electrical wires in home attics. To improve the fire safety of your home, you should hire a Wildlife Control technician to evict squirrels out of your home or have the wildlife control technician humane traps for squirrels. Here at Mid Atlantic Wildlife Control can help you resolve your squirrel infestation in Baltimore. Our Mid Atlantic Wildlife Control squirrel removal services include:

  1. A full home inspection to find all entry holes squirrels have created from chewing
  2. Squirrel feces clean and removal
  3. Full attic cleanout services
  4. Re-insulation services
  5. Squirrel trapping
  6. Squirrel damage repair
  7. Squirrel proof chimney cap installations
  8. Squirrel proof vent cover installations
  9. Squirrel emergency services

Here are the Baltimore communities we provide squirrel removal services for:

  • Baltimore City Squirrel removal/ Squirrel control
  • Carney Squirrel removal/ Squirrel control
  • Catonsville Squirrel removal/ Squirrel control
  • Dundalk Squirrel removal/ Squirrel control
  • Owings Mills Squirrel removal/ Squirrel control and other

For more information about our wildlife control services, contact us at 443-417-3137 or go to our contact us page. We humanely resolve wildlife dilemmas, no matter how big or small. Let us keep wildlife out of your sight and mind. Mid-Atlantic Wildlife Control is here to protect you from invasive wildlife. Our company is fully insured and licensed by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, the Pennsylvania Game Commission, Delaware Fish & Game and Virginia Fish & Game. Call us for wildlife control services. Check us out on Facebook and Twitter as well.