Do Electronic Pest Repellents really work?

Do Electronic Pest Repellents really work?

Recently, the market has surged with new brands and models of ultrasonic and electronic pest repellent devices. These devices claim to send out high frequency waves of sound that rodents, insects, and even pets will find intolerable. The question is, does this thing really work? Several years ago the FTC (Federal Trade Commission) warned all manufacturers of these devises that all of their claims in effectiveness must be met with scientific research. Thanks to the demands of the FTC, packaging now must market themselves more honestly and with research and proven results if possible. There was a flood of funded scientific research that followed. Results varied, overall, some electronic devises showed some results in certain pests. Can that statement be any more vague? The bottom line here is this: before you invest your money, know the facts.

  1. Repellents will only cause your problem to move around. If the sound waves do bother your rodents or insects it will just cause them to move out of the way of the annoyance, it will not harm or kill them.
  2. Tolerance. Rodents and pests will build up a tolerance to noises overtime, especially if there is a great food source nearby, and then your devices will be mostly ineffective.
  3. Be a realist. Those plug in devices are weak and short range, they won’t protect your whole house no matter how many you use. In addition there isn’t enough research done to prove they work as effectively as they claim.

To have pests removed from your home quickly and efficiently, contact your local pest professional.

Why Not to Touch a Dead Animal

Why Not to Touch a Dead Animal

When an animal dies in your home, it can raise a big stink – literally. You’ll want the source of the smell gone as soon as possible. Sometimes locating the source is simple but other times animals die in the walls or hard to reach places that are not visible. If you are able to locate the animal carcass it is important to not touch or handle it unless you have to, and here’s why. Dead animals can carry a host of bacteria and viruses that can be passed on to humans and pets. Tularemia is a disease that can be spread to humans via contact with a dead animal. It is a bacteria usually found in mammals, especially rodents and rabbits, and sometimes fish and birds. Symptoms vary from mild to life-threatening. While uncommon, rabies can be transmitted from a dead animal to a human through an opening on the skin. While risk is low it is still possible and it is better to be safe than sorry. One other factor to consider is once you remove a dead animal, how will you clean and sanitize the space as well as remove the odors? As a carcass decays it can leave behind it a host of unhealthy and unsanitary byproducts that need to be properly cleaned to prevent the spread of germs and eliminate the smell. There are steps we take at Mid-Atlantic Wildlife Control to make the removal process safe and efficient for you. We are able to locate the dead animal, even if it is inside of the walls or another isolated place in the house that is hidden from view. Then we safely remove the animal remains. Next, we sanitize and deodorize the space to ensure nothing harmful is left behind and you are free of any lingering odor. Lastly, we safely dispose of the dead animal for you. In the event that there is a dead deer on your Maryland property, keep in mind that it will present several additional issues. A dead deer smells, attracts birds and other unwanted pests, and removal is a very unpleasant job. We carry a deer salvage permit that allows us to perform deer carcass removal from private land. No matter how severe the damage is or how large the deer, we are equipped and will remove it quickly for you. Need a dead animal gone ASAP? Contact our professional team of experts now.

The Three Most Devastating Damages Wild Animals Can Cause to Your Home

The Three Most Devastating Damages Wild Animals Can Cause to Your Home

A variety of pests and animals can wreak havoc on your home or business. Animals need homes too, and sometimes our houses and building structures can seem all too inviting to a wild animal looking for shelter or a place to build. In the world of Wildlife Control we’ve seen damage caused by bats, rats, possum, and even birds. Damage can range from mild to severe, and may even have a homeowner concerned with filing an insurance claim to fix the repairs. Here are our top three most devastating ways animals can destroy your home.

 

1. Chewing Wires and Fire Rodents are known chewers. Rodents chew on almost anything because their teeth never stop growing, and chewing is necessary to keep their teeth short. When mice invade the home or squirrels overtake an attic they can find themselves searching for something to chew on. This can be anything in your home that isn’t metal, but too often becomes the wires in your walls or ceiling. Frayed electrical wiring can be expensive to have replaced, but more importantly can cause a fire. If you have a rodent infestation, you’ll want to contact your professional pest control team immediately.

 

2. Foundation Damage Groundhogs are known for their large and extensive burrows and can sometimes have up to five entrances and up to 45 feet of tunnel. They prefer to build their burrows against structures that provide overhead stability. These burrows provide a huge risk to the integrity of a buildings foundation; water can seep in when a den becomes flooded. Burrows can also collapse and cause degradation to the foundation block costing thousands in damage.

 

 

3. Roof Damage Raccoons are excellent climbers. It is no special feat for an adult raccoon to make its way to the top of your home in minutes. Raccoons are most often on a roof to find access to the attic. They can tear open eaves and even rip apart shingles in order to gain entry. Roofing repairs can become astronomical and an open hole in the roof can also cause leaks and water damage. To have a pest removed from your home or property, contact us now!

Get to Know Your Pest

Get to Know Your Pest

The House Mouse

“Know Your Enemy” is a quote best known from the legendary writings and teachings of The Art of War. While the house mouse may seem friendly enough, he is most certainly an enemy. So, to take a page from The Art of War, we are profiling one of our least favorite pests, the common house mouse. The house mouse is a small pesky rodent, with a characteristically pointed snout. You may have seen them scurry alongside the walls of your home or office. It has round ears, a long, mostly hairless tail, and is most commonly found in the color brown. They are small and usually only reach a few inches in length and a few ounces in weight as adults. This breed is the most common of all the mice species and although it is wild, mainly lives in association with humans. If you have ever had a pet mouse as a child, or seen a laboratory mouse on television or in the news, that is most often your common variety house mouse. Mice are mostly nocturnal and avoid bright lights. The average house mouse will sleep 12-13 hours per day. They live in a wide variety of hidden places around the home, but always close to a food source, and will create a nest of anything soft that they come upon. Mice are territorial to one another; one male will live with a group of females and their children and male mice (for the most part) respect each other’s given territories. Mice reproduce quickly and efficiently and gestation is only 19-21 days and can yield 3-14 offspring. One female can do this up to 10 times per year. They also tend to have a lifespan of one year, sometimes longer in captivity. The house mouse can spread disease, contaminate your food, and become invasive and damaging to the home. Once a home is infested, mouse droppings and urine will become an immediate problem and will be a great concern to the home owners food and kitchen tools. Mice can carry and transmit Lymphotcytic Choriomeningitis, most threatening to pregnant women. They also spread bacteria like rickettsialpox and leptospirosis. Research has been conducted discovering that young children who are exposed to mouse dander and feces may develop asthma and/or allergies later in life. Knowing your enemy is perhaps step one in defeating them. Now that you understand the common house mouse and know his appearance and behavior, you can more easily identify him. If you have a mouse or rodent problem in your home or office contact our professional team of experts now.