Why You Shouldn’t Confront a Raccoon in Your Attic

Why You Shouldn’t Confront a Raccoon in Your Attic

On April 2, 2015 the owners of this home on Carrollton Road in Annapolis , Maryland, returned from vacation to find their gable vent ripped out. The couple quickly realized they had raccoons living in the attic. Unsure of how to approach the situation, they did some internet research on how to get rid of raccoons living in the attic. They found a website that instructed them to go into the attic and harass the raccoon with a broom handle, so the raccoon leaves.

A Raccoon vs. a Broom

As the homeowners opened the attic hatch, they quickly realized that the raccoon had been living in the attic for a long time, due to the amount of raccoon feces that was everywhere. Armed with a broom handle and a flashlight, the homeowners found the raccoon and four small babies in a corner at the far end of the attic. The homeowners came within 25 feet of the mother raccoon and her four babies when the animal interpreted it as a threat and lunged at the homeowners, going for the leg. Grateful that the raccoon only tore his pants and missed his leg, the homeowner realized that the broom handle approach was a dangerous idea. He decided to contact our Anne Arundel raccoon removal company to evict the raccoons from the attic.

Professional Raccoon Removal

Our wildlife control technicians inspected the roof and identified two entry points, which is another indication that the raccoon has been living in the attic for a long time. One of the entry points was the gable vent the raccoon ripped out of the side of the home (see photo above). The other entry point was a hole the raccoon ripped open on the edge of the rooftop, thus allowing rain to cause moisture damage to the interior of the attic.

Our wildlife control technician reviewed a few options with the homeowners. Despite the fact that the raccoon had caused a great deal of damage, the homeowner chose the eviction fluid option that allows the mother raccoon to move her babies to her backup den site (all raccoons have two den sites within their territory). The next day, our technician re-inspected the attic to make sure the mother raccoon moved her babies out. After the technician completed re-inspection, he installed a new gable vent and repaired the hole in the roof. The large amount of raccoon feces in the attic posed a health risk to the occupants of the home. Our Annapolis wildlife removal company also offers attic cleanout services. These services include removing all attic insulation and cleaning the space with a powerful vacuum. Then new insulation is installed. If you encounter a raccoon in your attic, don’t try to confront it on your own. Mother raccoon can be defensive and even aggressive, so the safer way is to call Mid-Atlantic Wildlife Control and have our specialists take care of your raccoon problem.