You may find no greater delight than spotting a wild creature in your yard. But while many are fuzzy and as cute as a puppy dog, wild animals can also be dangerous and destructive. They eat your garden, spread diseases, and destroy structures. The shed is a prime target. So preventing shed damage from wildlife should be a top priority.

These five tips will help you keep it safe.

1. Don’t Leave Your Door Open Unattended

Not unlike humans, animals are curious. If they see a door open, and no people around, they may try to enter. On top of that, your shed is warm and protective. It’s the perfect place to build a nest or burrow, or so some animals may think.

However, if you come back later and close the door after it’s been open, you may trap an animal inside. It may be too scared to announce themselves when you do.

Once they’re trapped, you may not hear that creature trying to get out

because the shed is often away from the main structure. The animal will do a lot of damage to get free, including:

  • Scratching
  • Biting
  • Defecating
  • Urinating

They may even die. Then you’ll need dead animal removal services.

Not only does locking a wild animal in a shed cause damage. We know you’ll agree that feeling trapped is a horrible way to go.

Moreover, sheds don’t just attract wildlife. What if you draw in the neighbor’s cat? You don’t want that on your hands.

So please take this and other tips for preventing shed damage from wildlife to heart.

2. Check Inside Before Closing the Door

On that note, inevitably, someone will accidentally leave the shed open, especially if you have children. So, create a new habit, and before you close the door, walk around the inside slowly. Try to flush out any hiders.

And check the shed frequently over the next couple of days for signs of a trapped animal.

3. Cut Back Brush

When bushes and trees grow right up to the shed, it seems like an extension of the outdoors. This overgrowth may be the objective aesthetically. However, it invites wildlife to use the shed as a habitat. So cut any high grass, and remove bushes or small trees.

If any limbs hang near or over the shed, cut them back to avoid becoming a leaping platform for squirrels.

4. Replace the Screens

If you have windows on the shed, you may want to open them on a warm summer’s day to ventilate. That’s not necessarily a bad idea; however, it could invite animals in, similar to the way an open door would.

So check your screen for rips. If wildlife is tearing the screen, consider more hardy screen solutions designed for preventing shed damage from wildlife.

While you’re at it, look for other ways that creatures may get inside and seal them.

5. Use Capsaicin

Does capsaicin sound familiar? It’s because it’s the natural chemical that habaneras contain. This chemical allows the nerves in your mouth, nose, and eyes to sense heat. Makers of pepper spray and other personal protection devices use this chemical in those tools. In short, it’s a safe and effective way to repel wildlife from your shed. Many animals can smell and taste hot peppers in the same way you can.

However, please apply animal repellents with caution. Avoid breathing it in or contacting the skin. If you get it in your eyes, flush them with water. Use milk if the exposure is severe.

Raccoons, squirrels, and rats, in particular, hate the smell of capsaicin and will avoid the structure. However, other creatures like birds, cats, snakes, and bees don’t taste the heat. So you’ll need different strategies for removing snakes and birds.

Preventing Shed Damage from Wildlife

When it comes to preventing shed damage from wildlife, you need to take a multi-faceted approach. This approach includes practical tips, like not leaving the door open. Moreover, it also involves maintenance. Keep brush and limbs away from your shed. Capsaicin is just one of several natural animal repellents.

You don’t have to battle shed damage alone. Mid-Atlantic Wildlife Control offers you safe and humane wildlife removal services as well as prevention. Give us a call at [Direct] to schedule an appointment.